Do family vacations lead to divorce?
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Do family vacations lead to divorce?

On Behalf of | Feb 10, 2021 | Divorce

If you’re thinking that scheduling a relaxing family vacation in North Carolina might just be the thing to fix your marital problems, you may want to think again. Although family vacations do not necessarily contribute to higher divorce rates, they could cause couples who are already struggling to decide that enough is enough. The following are a few reasons why couples who are just getting back from vacation might be more likely to divorce.

False expectations

Couples who have issues within their marriages may feel a false sense of hope that taking a vacation will rekindle their love for one another. Unfortunately, the belief that getting away from the daily grind will fix their problems isn’t always reality. When couples realize that the cracks in their marriage are still there after taking a vacation, they might move on to filing for divorce.

Added stress and strain

It may be easy to think that your relationship troubles will be resolved just by going to a theme park or resort. However, many family law professionals are seeing a growing trend in vacations actually causing even more stress and strain between a couple. Vacations can create a variety of stressful situations caused by things like:

  • Planning an itinerary
  • Making reservations
  • Taking time off work

Problems that already exist are magnified

During a vacation, couples tend to let their guards down and try to relax. If there are already issues within the marriage, they can easily be magnified during vacation. For example, if one spouse is more laid-back and the other likes to plan everything out, a sense of conflict might be heightened during a vacation.

A family vacation doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll be at risk of divorce. However, it’s important to realize that it probably won’t cure any conflicts you’re already dealing with in your marriage. If you’re at a breaking point, an attorney may be able to help you understand your options.