How remarriage affects child support
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How remarriage affects child support

| Jun 25, 2021 | Divorce

After a divorce, remarrying often changes the family dynamics for your children. However, many parents are not aware of how remarrying affects child support. In North Carolina, the non-custodial parent generally needs to provide child support to the parent living with the children. Thus, every parent has responsibility for their child. After remarrying, the parental obligations do not end. However, the amount each parent pays depends on their income and the number of children covered. If a child has special needs, the court can increase the child support award.

Impact of remarriage on child support

Once you remarry, your financial obligations in supporting your child do not change. However, they result in a ripple effect to factors that will affect the child support that you receive. Although the new spouse’s income might not determine the child support, it may have an impact.

When awarding child support, a court does not consider the stepparent’s income. However, when the stepparent is meeting much of the household expenses, most of the other parent’s income is often directed to child support. When a parent remarries a person with significant income, their disposable income increases. Thus, there’s a change in their child support role

When a non-custodial parent remarries, there’s no change in the child support award. Moreover, the income of the new spouse is not justified in modifying child support awards. However, in some instances, remarriage affects the employment status of a parent. Such situations result in changing or terminating child support. An example is when remarriage results in the relocation of a spouse or increased traveling expenses.

When a divorced parent starts a new family, their obligation on child support doesn’t change. Hence, before remarrying, the parent should consider the existing commitments.