Why parents should listen to their kid’s feelings after a divorce
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Why parents should listen to their kid’s feelings after a divorce

| Oct 21, 2020 | Uncategorized

Child custody battles in North Carolina can be incredibly stressful and draining. And if the child decides that they want to live with their other parent, the custodial parent might have to deal with old wounds opening up again. However, they should step back and consider the child’s feelings before jumping to conclusions. Otherwise, they might cause unnecessary stress for a child who’s already stressed in the wake of a divorce.

How should parents react when their child wants to live with their former spouse?

No parent wants to hear “Mommy, I want to go live with Daddy” after a frustrating child custody battle. However, the issue isn’t going to go away. If they shut down the conversation, the child will either dwell in silence or bring it up at a later date. The conversation might be painful, but they should deal with it as soon as possible so that they’re acting in their child’s best interests.

Additionally, they shouldn’t try to immediately change their child’s mind. If they genuinely think their former spouse is an unfit or abusive parent, they can bring that up at a later date. But they shouldn’t immediately shut down their child by listing all the things they hate about their former spouse. Instead, they should try to consider the child’s point of view and realize that the child probably has positive memories with this individual. They shouldn’t expect their child to understand why the divorce happened or who was at fault.

Can an attorney help parents resolve child custody disputes?

Hiring an attorney can be the best way to act in a child’s best interests. An attorney might be able to look at the issue objectively and help their client decide if they should aim for full child custody. They could also help the parent protect their rights in court.